Exhibitions

Rewind: 1970s to 1990s Works from the MCA Collection

Images

  • A close-up image shows an older person wearing a military uniform with many brightly colored badges on the lapel of the jacket.
A close-up image shows an older person wearing a military uniform with many brightly colored badges on the lapel of the jacket.
Alfredo Jaar, Guess Who Is Coming To Dinner, 1988. Duratrans and light box; 20 × 20 × 5 in. (50.8 × 50.8 × 12.7 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, Gerald S. Elliott Collection, 1995.48
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Lorna Simpson, Necklines, 1989. Gelatin silver prints and engraved Plexiglas plaques; installed: 68 ½ x 70 in. (174 × 177.8 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift from The Howard and Donna Stone Collection, 2002.63.a–e. © 1989 Lorna Simpson
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Tony Tasset, Spew, 1993. Silver dye-bleach print; 53 ½ x 53 ½ in. (135.9 × 135.9 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art, gift of Suzette L. and Timothy P. Flood, 2007.10. © 1993 Tony Tasset
Photo: © MCA Chicago
Matthew Barney, Cremaster 2: The Drone’s Cell, 1999. Chromogenic development print in acrylic frame; 43 × 54 in. (109.2 × 137.2 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift from The Howard and Donna Stone Collection, 2002.7. © 1999 Mathew Barney
Photo: © MCA Chicago
Gillian Wearing, Self-Portrait as my Mother, Jean Gregory, 2003. Gelatin silver print; 53 1/8 × 45 5/8 in. (134.9 × 115.9 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, restricted gift of the Collectors Forum in memory of Tom Ruben, 2003.8. Courtesy of the artist and Regen Projects, Los Angeles
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Sharon Lockhart, Enrique Nava Enedina: Oaxacan Exhibit Hall, National Museum of Anthropology, Mexico City, 1999. Chromogenic development prints; three parts, overall: 49 × 217 ½ in. (124.5 × 552.5 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of George and Lori Bucciero, 1999.53.a–c. © 1999 Sharon Lockhart
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Richard Artschwager, Polish Rider I, 1970–71. Acrylic on Celotex; sSight: 44 × 60 3/16 in. (111.8 × 152.9 cm), framed: 45 ½ x 61 9/16 × 1 ½ in. (115.57 × 156.37 × 3.81 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of Mrs. Robert B. Mayer, 1984.2. © 1970–71 Richard Artschwager
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Mike Kelley, Craft Morphology Flow Chart, 1991. Dolls and figures, gelatin silver prints, acrylic on paper, folding banquet tables, and folding card tables; overall dimensions variable. Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of Lannan Foundation, 1997.41
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Sharon Lockhart, Goshogaoka Girls Basketball Team Group #1: Yuka Koishihara and Eri Kobayashi; Yuka Ishigami; Chinatsu Narui and Hitomi Shibazaki; Kumiko Shirai, 1997. Chromogenic development prints; four parts, each: 32 5/16 × 27 3/8 in. (81.3 × 68.6 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of Bucciero Family, 2008.23.a–d. © 1997 Sharon Lockhart
Photo: Nathan Keay, © MCA Chicago
Tony Tasset, Robert Smithson (Las Vegas), 1995. Silver dye-bleach print; 83 × 49 × 3 in. (210.8 × 124.5 × 7.6 cm). Collection Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, gift of the artist and Rhona Hoffman Gallery, and restricted gift of Jack and Sandra P. Guthman, 1995.123. © 1995 Tony Tasset
Photo © MCA Chicago

About

During its 40-year history, the MCA has distinguished itself with groundbreaking exhibitions that have contributed substantially to the evolving history of contemporary art. These exhibitions have, in turn, stimulated the museum and its supporters to acquire important and often numerous pieces by these artists. A resulting hallmark of the MCA Collection is the presence of significant, in-depth bodies of work by artists. By displaying several examples of an artist’s work, visitors can gain a better understanding of their working process and development of ideas over the span of several years.

Rewind presents concentrations of work by artists whom the MCA has collected in depth, or whose pieces in the collection are definitive examples of their singular aesthetic. Showcasing key artists of the last 40 years whose work has been and continues to be defining to international contemporary art underscores the MCA’s role as a leader in and incubator of artistic innovation.

Rewind focuses on works from these particular decades to show how the groundbreaking work from the recent past is only now becoming historicized for its critical take on art institutions, identity politics, and new approaches to video and photography in the late-20th century. It includes works by Vito Acconci, Richard Artschwager, Matthew Barney, Alfredo Jaar, Mike Kelley, Sharon Lockhart, Richard Long, Richard Prince, Lorna Simpson, Tony Tasset, and Gillian Wearing.

Featured prominently in this exhibition, Chicago Mud Circle by British sculptor Richard Long is on view to the public for the first time in 10 years. This work exemplifies Long’s use of local materials in his paintings and sculptures as a way to bring elements of nature into the gallery. Created in 1996, Chicago Mud Circle has been concealed behind a temporary wall in one of our fourth-floor galleries for the past decade.

This exhibition is organized by Julie Rodrigues Widholm, Pamela Alper Associate Curator.

Funding

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by Harris Bank

Additional support is provided by Richard A. Lenon and Judith Neisser.

Official Airline of the Museum of Contemporary Art